People

MSc (Brain and Cognitive Sciences)

Ph.D.-student

Present Work:

I study how a neural correlate of consciousness, the Visual Awareness Negativity (VAN) (Wilenius-EmetRevonsuo, & Ojanen, 2004), relates to how subjects rate their visual experiences on the Perceptual Awareness Scale (PAS) (Ramsøy, & Overgaard, 2004). Furthermore, I am involved in a project investigating whether the symptoms of visual neglect arise because of a spatial deficiency or because of a perceptual deficiency.

Future Work:

My Ph.D. project is part of a collective project with Professor Morten Overgaard, Assistant Professor Thor Grünbaum, PostDoc Mark Schram Christensen, and Ph.D.-student Mikkel Vinding, which is titled Phenomenal Consciousness and Cognitive Motor Control. My area of responsibility will be to investigate conscious experiences of movements, ranging from self-initiated motor actions to forced movements. The main focus of investigation will be on how and if the experiences differ as to what kinds of neural traces they leave behind in the brain. This will be used to establish correspondence between subjective and objective measures of consciousness of movements.

Past Work:

Involved in a study relating GABA-concentration to performance on different visual tasks.

At Emory University I programmed a visual masking experiment for testing on rhesus monkeys at the Laboratory of Comparative Primate Cognition at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. Title of research project: Dissociation of visual detection and visual localization in rhesus monkeys.

At the University of Amsterdam I organised and carried out an experiment centred around a feedback-task, where children between the ages of 7 and 13 years were tested. Subsequently I carried out the statistical analyses and Markov-modelling of the data. Title of research project: Cognitive strategy differences as an index of developmental differences in children and adolescents.

Email: lau.andersen@cnru.dk

Phone: +45 78 46 99 50

Areas of expertise:Metacognition, Consciousness, Functional Brain Development, and Primates